Taliban disperses Afghan women’s march for ‘work and freedom’ | News

Taliban fighters beat feminine protesters and fired into the air on Saturday to dispersed a uncommon rally within the Afghan capital, Kabul, days earlier than the primary anniversary of the group’s return to energy.

About 40 ladies marched on the training ministry in Kabul, chanting “bread, work and freedom”. Regardless of the pledges made when it retook energy, the Taliban has restricted Afghan ladies’s rights, together with conserving highschool lady college students out of faculty.

Some protesters who took refuge in close by outlets had been chased and crushed by Taliban fighters with their rifle butts, in keeping with the AFP information company.

The demonstrators carried a banner, which learn “August 15 is a black day” as they demanded rights to work and political participation.

“Justice, justice. We’re fed up with ignorance,” they chanted, many not sporting face veils.

“Sadly, the Taliban from the intelligence service got here and fired within the air,” stated Zholia Parsi, one of many organisers of the march.

“They dispersed the ladies, tore our banners and confiscated the cell phones of many women.”

However protester Munisa Mubariz pledged to proceed combating for girls’s rights.

“If the Taliban wish to silence this voice, it’s not potential. We’ll protest from our houses,” she stated.

Some journalists overlaying the demonstration – the primary ladies’s rally in months – had been additionally crushed by the Taliban fighters, an AFP correspondent noticed.

‘Making ladies invisible’

Whereas the Taliban authorities have allowed and even promoted some rallies towards the USA, they’ve declined permission for any ladies’s rally since they returned to energy.

After seizing management final yr, the Taliban has gone again on its guarantees of girls’s rights and media freedom, bringing again reminiscences of its harsh rule from 1996 to 2001.

Tens of hundreds of ladies have been shut out of secondary faculties, whereas ladies have been barred from returning to many authorities jobs.

Taliban fighters disperse Afghan women protesters in Kabul.
Taliban fighters attempt to disperse Afghan feminine protesters in Kabul [Wakil Kohsar/AFP]

Girls have additionally been banned from travelling alone on lengthy journeys and might solely go to public gardens and parks within the capital on designated days, when males usually are not allowed.

In Might, the nation’s supreme chief and chief of the Taliban, Haibatullah Akhunzada, ordered ladies to completely cowl themselves in public, together with their faces – ideally with an all-encompassing burqa.

The United Nations and rights teams have repeatedly slammed the Taliban authorities for imposing the restrictions on ladies.

These insurance policies present a “sample of absolute gender segregation and are geared toward making ladies invisible within the society”, Richard Bennett, UN particular rapporteur on human rights in Afghanistan, advised reporters in Kabul throughout a go to in Might.

Human Rights Watch on Thursday known as on the Taliban to “reverse their horrifying and misogynistic” choice to bar ladies from training.

“This is able to ship a message that the Taliban are keen to rethink their most egregious actions,” Fereshta Abbasi, Afghanistan researcher on the rights group, stated in a press release.

Some Afghan ladies initially pushed again towards the curbs, holding small protests.

However the Taliban quickly rounded up the protest organisers, holding them incommunicado whereas denying they’d been detained.

A research by the Worldwide Labor Group (ILO) this yr documented a disproportionate drop in ladies’s employment in Afghanistan – 16 % within the months instantly following the Taliban takeover. In distinction, male employment dropped by 6 %.

Taliban fighters fire into the air to disperse Afghan women protesters in Kabul.
Taliban fighters hearth into the air [Wakil Kohsar/AFP]

Previous to the Taliban takeover, ladies made up 22 % of the Afghan workforce. Whereas the determine was nonetheless dismal, it mirrored years of social progress in a deeply patriarchal and conservative society like Afghanistan.

Working ladies in Afghanistan are additionally weak to unemployment shocks because of the present financial disaster, restrictions on ladies’s motion by the Taliban, and the prevalent patriarchy.

Whereas the Afghan financial system has severely suffered because of the Western sanctions on the Taliban, women-centric companies had been among the many worst affected because of the further restrictions on ladies.

A latest World Financial institution survey famous that 42 % of women-owned companies in Afghanistan had quickly closed in contrast with the closure of 26 % of the companies owned by males.

Moreover, about 83 % of the businesswomen indicated that they had been anticipating income losses over the following six months, forcing them to have interaction in coping mechanisms corresponding to downsizing their workers, typically comprising largely of girls.

Journalism ‘bleeding to dying’

Quite a few media retailers have ceased their work and tons of of journalists have misplaced their jobs within the final one yr, in keeping with Reporters With out Borders (RSF).

“Journalism in Afghanistan is bleeding to dying,” RSF director Christian Mihr stated in a press release on Friday.

“The Taliban have enacted quite a few legal guidelines that prohibit freedom of the press and encourage the persecution and intimidation of media and journalists,” she added.

In response to RSF, a very good third of 550 media retailers that had been energetic as of August 15, 2021 – the day the Taliban took over management once more after greater than 20 years – have been shut down.

Mexican journalist killed in bar shooting — 13th this year | Freedom of the Press News

As Mexico grapples with a wave of violence towards members of the press, small native retailers are particularly in danger.

Three folks, together with a distinguished native journalist, have been shot useless inside a bar in central Mexico, marking the thirteenth homicide of a media employee this 12 months as violence towards Mexican journalists escalates.

Guanajuato Governor Diego Rodriguez Vallejo condemned the Tuesday evening killing of Ernesto Mendez, the director of the native outlet Tu Voz, or Your Voice, after a gaggle of gunmen stormed the bar, which Mendez additionally owned within the city of San Luis de la Paz.

Mendez had additionally labored on the information website Zona Franca a number of years in the past, in response to its director Carmen Martinez.

The journalist had beforehand acquired threats, in response to human rights organisation Article 19.

“It wasn’t simply the proprietor of the institution who was killed however sadly others had been as nicely,” Luis Gerardo Sanchez, the mayor of the city advised a information convention on Wednesday.

The assault additionally left one particular person severely wounded, he added. The opposite victims weren’t named.

It’s not identified whether or not Mendez was enrolled within the Mexican authorities’s safety programme for journalists and human rights defenders, the Related Press information company reported.

Journalists concerned with small information organisations in Mexico’s inside have develop into simple targets, and small city officers and politicians are sometimes suspects, together with organised crime.

The killing of Mendez came about about one month after 47-year-old Antonio de la Cruz, a reporter for the regional newspaper Expreso, was shot and killed exterior his dwelling in Ciudad Victoria in northeastern Mexico.

De la Cruz was the twelfth Mexican journalist killed for the reason that begin of the 12 months, making 2022 the deadliest 12 months on document for Mexican reporters.

Two Mexican journalists, Yessenia Mollinedo and Sheila Johana Garcia, had been murdered within the state of Veracruz in Could, and greater than 150 journalists have been killed since 2000.

Amid the spate of violent assaults, Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has been criticised for not doing sufficient to guard journalists, and for his personal combative relationship with the media.

The group Reporters With out Borders stated that Obrador had not “undertaken the required reforms to cease the spiral of violence towards the press”.

Mexico is probably the most harmful nation for reporters exterior of struggle zones.

Whereas a authorities programme has been set as much as shield journalists, press freedom teams say that it’s inadequate.

Outrage as another Kashmiri journalist stopped from flying abroad | Freedom of the Press News

One more Kashmiri journalist has been stopped by the Indian authorities from flying overseas as outrage grows over a unbroken clampdown on press freedom in Indian-administered Kashmir and its residents.

Unbiased journalist Aakash Hassan, 25, was on his option to Sri Lanka for a reporting project final week when immigration officers at New Delhi airport barred him from boarding the flight, making him the fourth Kashmiri journalist in a couple of yr to face the motion.

“I received my boarding go and after I was on the immigration, I used to be informed to attend on the aspect,” Hassan informed Al Jazeera.

“Then I used to be taken to a room and interrogated by two individuals who didn’t determine themselves. They requested me what sort of journalism I do. They requested about my background,” he mentioned.

Hassan mentioned the interrogation continued for 5 hours.

“My passport and boarding go have been stamped with ‘Stopped with out prejudice’ and my baggage was offloaded,” mentioned Hassan, who additionally shared footage of the stamping on Twitter.

The immigration officers, Hassan mentioned, didn’t present any justification for why he was stopped.

“They mentioned there was a lookout round issued on my identify however they denied disclosing which company had issued it,” he mentioned.

A lookout round is issued by India’s legislation enforcement businesses to cease a person – both absconding or wished – from leaving the nation. It’s largely used at immigration checkpoints at worldwide airports.

Kashmir Press Club building is pictured through a closed gate
The Kashmir Press Membership in Srinagar was sealed by Indian authorities earlier this yr [File: Dar Yasin/AP]

‘Focused for our work’

Hassan mentioned there isn’t a prison case in opposition to him.

“The worst factor is I don’t know who I ought to strategy. That is going to take a psychological toll on me. We’re being focused for our work,” he informed Al Jazeera.

“It’ll jeopardise my future.”

Kashmiri journalists say issuing of lookout circulars in opposition to them and stopping them from worldwide journey is a brand new development.

Final month, Pulitzer Prize-winning Kashmiri photojournalist Sanna Irshad Mattoo was prevented from flying to Paris for a photograph exhibition.

“I used to be shocked and heartbroken,” the 28-year-old then informed Al Jazeera, including that she, like Hassan, didn’t have a prison case in opposition to her.

Mattoo, a contributor to the Reuters information company, was a part of a four-member workforce of photojournalists that received the Pulitzer final yr for his or her protection of the COVID-19 disaster in India.

Final yr, two different Kashmiri journalists – Zahid Rafiq and Ruwa Shah – have been barred from flying overseas.

In 2019, unbiased journalist Gowhar Geelani was stopped at New Delhi airport when he was on his option to Germany to hitch a job.

There have been related examples from outdoors Kashmir as effectively.

In April this yr, Aakar Patel, former head of Amnesty Worldwide in India, mentioned he was stopped from flying to america due to a prison case filed in opposition to the rights physique. Authorities mentioned Patel was on a “lookout round” issued by India’s Central Bureau of Investigation.

Days earlier than that, outstanding Indian journalist Rana Ayyub was additionally stopped from boarding a flight to London the place she was scheduled to deal with a press occasion. She was allowed to fly 5 days later after she approached a courtroom of legislation.

Some Kashmiris allege their passports weren’t being renewed by the Indian authorities.

“The passport verification course of has been pending for greater than six months,” a 30-year-old Kashmiri journalist who didn’t need to be recognized informed Al Jazeera.

‘Systematic sample of harassment’

Kashmiri teachers and journalists finding out or working overseas say they worry visiting dwelling over the danger of being barred from flying again.

“They [authorities] have used all types of means to harass journalists, questioning them, harassing households, arrests and now stopping them from going out of India is a brand new problem,” Kashmiri journalist Ahmad who didn’t need to be recognized by his first identify informed Al Jazeera.

“With every day, doing journalism in Kashmir is changing into not possible … Journalism in Kashmir is sort of lifeless,” he added.

Al Jazeera reached out to a number of authorities officers in Kashmir for his or her feedback on the difficulty. One official, talking on the situation of anonymity, justified the restrictions on Kashmiri journalists.

“It [the lookout circular] is being issued solely in opposition to these people who peddle a sustained insidious narrative in opposition to the [Indian] state. They [journalists] are a part of the ‘terror ecosystem’ and the state is inside its rights to problem lookout circulars in opposition to such individuals,” he mentioned.

After India’s Hindu nationalist authorities stripped Kashmir of its restricted autonomy in 2019, the disputed area has witnessed a collection of crackdowns in opposition to journalists and media organisations.

In January this yr, the Kashmir Press Membership – the biggest unbiased media physique within the area – was dissolved by the federal government. Kashmiri journalists complain of being routinely summoned to police stations and interrogated about their work.

Journalist Aasif Sultan in handcuffs on his way to judicial custody
Kashmiri journalist Aasif Sultan has been in jail for almost 4 years [File: Saqib Majeed/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images]

Some journalists have been booked beneath stringent legal guidelines, together with the Illegal Actions Prevention Act (UAPA) and the Public Security Act (PSA), which permit lengthy detention of an individual with out trial.

India is ranked one hundred and fiftieth within the World Press Freedom Index 2022, down from 142 the earlier yr and at present under Hong Kong and Turkey.

“The journey bans are a part of a scientific sample of harassment in opposition to Kashmiri journalists, who’ve more and more confronted arbitrary arrest, frivolous authorized instances, threats, bodily assaults, and raids since August 2019,” media watchdog the Committee to Defend Journalists (CPJ) tweeted final month.

Referring to Hassan’s case, CPJ mentioned, “Overseas governments should deal with arbitrary journey restrictions on Kashmiri journalists as severe violations of human rights in any engagement with the Indian authorities.”

Meenakshi Ganguly, South Asia director of Human Rights Watch, informed Al Jazeera “arbitrary restrictions” on Kashmiri journalists travelling overseas have been “extraordinarily regarding” and violated their livelihood and freedom of motion.

Geeta Seshu, co-founder of the Free Speech Collective, an unbiased organisation that advocates press freedom in India, mentioned “persevering with harassment and intimidation” of Kashmiri journalists by stopping them from flying overseas “smacks of discrimination”.

“It’s also disturbing because it seeks to ship a message to unbiased journalists that their proper of free entry and mobility is incumbent on their obedience and acquiescence to the powers that be,” she informed Al Jazeera.

“That is undemocratic and violates their elementary proper to free expression. So many journalists from India have travelled to varied hassle spots, together with Sri Lanka, with out being stopped or curbed in any method.”

Mexican journalist shot, marks 12th reporter murdered this year | Freedom of the Press News

Violence focusing on reporters in Mexico continues to rise, as 47-year-old Antonio de la Cruz was shot exterior his dwelling.

A Mexican journalist was shot and killed whereas leaving his dwelling in Ciudad Victoria in northeastern Mexico.

His 23-year-old daughter was additionally significantly injured within the gun assault on Wednesday.

The sufferer, 47-year-old Antonio de la Cruz, a reporter for the regional newspaper Expreso, is the twelfth Mexican journalist murdered this yr amid rising violence towards members of the press.

De la Cruz labored for Expreso for almost three a long time, reporting on rural and social points whereas residing within the metropolis of Ciudad Victoria. The town is situated within the border state of Tamaulipas, which has confronted problems with violence and organised crime.

The taking pictures of de la Cruz is the newest in a string of violent assaults on journalists in Mexico, making 2022 the deadliest yr on file for members of the nation’s press.

Mexico is probably the most harmful nation for reporters exterior of battle zones.

Two Mexican journalists, Yessenia Mollinedo and Sheila Johana Garcia, had been murdered within the state of Veracruz in Could, and greater than 150 journalists have been killed since 2000. These employed by smaller regional retailers usually face probably the most danger.

Human rights and press freedom teams have lamented the violence confronted by Mexican journalists and referred to as on the federal government to behave.

On its web site, the group Reporters With out Borders mentioned that Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador had not “undertaken the mandatory reforms to cease the spiral of violence towards the press”.

President Obrador has been criticised for his hostility to the press, whom he has attacked repeatedly throughout his tenure.

De la Cruz was described by Miguel Domínguez, the director of Expreso, as “very conscious of the truth of Tamaulipas, very courageous”, in a tv interview.

It isn’t the primary time the paper has been threatened with violence. A automobile bomb exploded in entrance of the paper’s places of work in 2012, and a human head was delivered in a cooler with a be aware warning the publication towards reporting on violence within the metropolis in 2018.

Francisco García Cabeza de Vaca, governor of Tamaulipas, has insisted that the homicide of de la Cruz will “not go unpunished”, and the federal prosecutor’s workplace has mentioned that it will open an investigation into the killing.

Nonetheless, impunity has been an sadly constant characteristic of the murders of Mexican journalists, and a authorities program designed to guard reporters has been criticised as inadequate.

In accordance with the Committee to Shield Journalists, 15 Mexican journalists are presently lacking.

UN condemns Mali’s ban on French media | Freedom of the Press News

Geneva, Switzerland – The UN Excessive Commissioner for Human Rights criticised Mali’s determination to ban French media retailers and known as on its navy rulers to reverse their determination.

“We’re deeply dismayed by the Malian media regulator’s determination to definitively droop Radio France Worldwide [RFI] and France24,” stated a spokesperson for Excessive Commissioner Michelle Bachelet on Friday.

“These suspensions are the newest in a string of actions curbing press freedom and the liberty of expression in Mali, and are available at a time when extra, not much less, scrutiny is required.”

Mali’s navy leaders first imposed the suspensions on March 16, accusing the 2 broadcasters of airing false allegations about studies of human rights violations by the military.

On Wednesday, the Excessive Authority for Communication introduced these provisional suspensions can be definitive.

Journalist associations have denounced a rise in assaults and smear campaigns towards reporters over the previous yr, particularly towards representatives of French media retailers. International and native reporters protecting Mali have denounced a worsening of the local weather for media professionals within the nation.

“We didn’t have this type of scrutiny earlier than,” stated a freelancer contributing to French media, who requested to not be named for safety considerations. “The state of affairs has received worse since tensions between France and Mali began to extend. It’s a political situation.”

‘Pervasive chilling impact’

On Friday, the Committee to Defend Journalists additionally known as on the authorities to reverse their determination to ban RFI and France 24.

“Malian authorities’ determination to solidify these suspensions signifies simply how dedicated they’re to denying these of their nation entry to data,” stated Angela Quintal, CPJ’s Africa programme coordinator, in an announcement.

On February 6, French journalist Benjamin Roger, a reporter on task for Jeune Afrique, was arrested and expelled inside 24 hours of his arrival within the Malian capital, Bamako. The authorities stated the reporter didn’t have press accreditation. Per week earlier, they introduced it might turn out to be more durable for media representatives to acquire a media allow.

“Press accreditation has not often been demanded till now,” stated Reporters With out Borders in an announcement, “and missing it has not prevented journalists from working freely.”

On April 8, Reporters With out Borders marked one yr from the kidnapping of French journalist Olivier Dubois, a correspondent for French publications Libération, Le Level, and Jeune Afrique. On March 14, the al Qaeda-linked Jama’a Nusrat ul-Islam wa al-Muslimin (JNIM), a coalition of armed teams, launched a video exhibiting he was nonetheless alive.

French assist employee Sophie Petronin was kidnapped in Gao in 2016 and launched after 4 years. In 2013, Ghislaine Dupont and Claude Verlon, two journalists of RFI, had been kidnapped and killed by gunmen within the Malian city of Kidal as they completed an interview with a Tuareg separatist chief.

A member of the Malian special forces stands guard during the ceremony that celebrates the national army day
A member of the Malian particular forces stands guard in Kati, Mali [File: Florent Vergnes/AFP]

In the meantime, the UN denounced how such a state of affairs is inducing these reporters who’re nonetheless contained in the nation to apply self-censorship.

“The present local weather is one with a pervasive chilling impact on journalists and bloggers,” UN Spokesperson Ravina Shamdasani instructed reporters on Friday.

“Our workplace continues to doc critical allegations of violations of worldwide human rights regulation and worldwide humanitarian regulation in lots of elements of the nation, and we stay significantly involved by steps to additional shrink the already restricted civic area.”

Tensions between Mali and France have elevated since a navy coup led by Colonel Assimi Goita on August 8, 2020, that overthrew elected President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, who was supported by France.

In June 2021, France, a former colonial energy within the area, halted its joint navy operations with Malian forces awaiting ensures that civilians return to positions of energy.

French President Emmanuel Macron introduced he would begin a withdrawal of troops, about 5,100 troopers, stationed within the area since 2013 below its so-called Operation Barkhane spanning 5 international locations within the Sahel – Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania and Niger.

In response to the military’s energy seize in Mali, the Financial Neighborhood of West African States (ECOWAS) regional bloc and the African Union suspended Mali from their organisations and threatened sanctions.

In January, Malian Prime Minister Choguel Kokalla Maiga accused France of selling insecurity and division within the nation and expelled its ambassador.

In accordance with Reporters With out Borders, Mali is ranked 99th out of 180 international locations within the 2021 World Press Freedom Index.